#59: SHADOWS & LIGHT (Vue)
#58: ADVANCED DIRT MAPPING (Vue)
#57: SSS IN VUE 9, AND THE "SPECKLE" PROBLEM
#56: THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAIL OF ART
#55: FIXING POSER CLOTHING
#54: MAKING "FOREST WAR - GOBLIN SHAMAN"
#53: MAKING A STUDIO RENDER FOR VUE
(and other apps)
#49: NEBULA MKIII (Vue)
#48: RENDER SETTINGS FOR VUE (Vue)
#47: POSTWORK - MAKING A RENDER INTENSE (Any)
#46: MAKING RIVERS THAT FOLLOW TERRAIN HEIGHTS (Vue or Bryce)

TUTORIAL #58: ADVANCED DIRT MAPPING


As noted in a prior tutorial, adding dirt and grime is essential to get realism in a picture.
In this tutorial I'll show how I added complex dirt and grime to an imported Poser scene, to improve it.
For this tutorial, I used Faveral's "Medieval Docks" as I'm working on a scene using it, and he's one of my favourite content creators :)

Now, although Faveral added grime to some of the textures, a content creator can't make grime for YOUR scene, as your needs/scene can be very different, and once the model maker adds grime to the original textures you can't take it OFF.
This is important to understand as both an artist and content maker.

Once dirt, wear etc has been added to the original texture of a model, it's usually impossible to remove it.
So, if a model is meant to show say, a dark urban surround, covering in dark slimy grime, it's not going to be suitable for use in say, the desert, because the colours and wear would be totally different.

However, in your app (in my case that's Vue), you can add procedural and/or texture based grime on TOP of the underlying original texture (alas some older apps can't do layered materials though)With Vue this is easy because it has layers in its materials, so you can add a new layer on top of the original texture, like Photoshop or similar :)


ROLL MOUSE OVER PICTURE BELOW TO SEE DIFFERENCE DIRT MAPPING MAKES TO ORIGINAL IMAGE!

I rendered the scene above without the water, by the way, to keep render times down and it wasn't really necessary for this tutorial ;)

I'll show how and why I made the grime etc for each part of the scene, so you can see what steps may need to be done to best fit things for your imported objects etc

An important thing to realize, is that the MAPPING mode of each imported object will determine how best to set your material mapping in your app!
If a model of a building has been properly layed out in a UV mapping program, things should go well and easy, otherwise...there maybe problems :(
This is another reason why content makers should do their best to use clean, simple UV maps that are logical.
UV Maps that have pieces of a rectangular building, but broken up into little bits all over the texture map can be a nightmare! Likewise, using cylindrical mapping on a square office block is not very helpful.


 

 


 

It helps a ton to be able to SEE what the grime looks like on a clean surface, first!
So in the Vue editor, altering the material's temporary dsiplay colours (see pic below) helps a ton.

You usually have to tweak mapping modes and scaling to get grime looking good on each object.

And "grime" of course can be various things, such as "verdigris" corrosion on bronze, so colours etc need adjsuted.
 
 
I hope you find this of use! :)

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All original art, writing on this site, copyright of Steven James, "Silverblade the Enchanter" ©2012